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No Rescue Needed: Baby Animals Are Best Left Alone, Brookfield Police Say

This baby fox was thought to be injured but was really just waiting for its mother to return.
This baby fox was thought to be injured but was really just waiting for its mother to return. Photo Credit: Brookfield Police
This fox was hidden away for safe keeping by its mother.
This fox was hidden away for safe keeping by its mother. Photo Credit: Brookfield Police

BROOKFIELD, Conn. – Brookfield Police were sent out to take care of a sick baby fox recently, only to discover the fox in question was left in a safe spot by its mother.

With warmer weather in the forecast, more and more residents will be enjoying the outdoors.

Brookfield officials want to warn residents that it is great to  observe nature from a distance but approaching to make contact should be avoided.

Connecticut State Environmental Conservation Police is reminding residents, it is normal for many animals to leave their young alone for long periods of time. In all likelihood, the adult is nearby watching and waiting to return.

White-tailed Deer: The only time a female (doe) will be found with a fawn is during feeding times. Fawns are fed three to four times a day, each feeding lasting about 15 minutes. Authorities recommend leaving fawns be for at least 48 hours.

Rabbits: Baby rabbits are one of the wild animals rescued most often, but usually do not need human help. Mother rabbits are only at the nest to feed their young twice a day for about five minutes – at dawn and dusk. Often times, rabbits nest in the middle of a backyard so they can see any predators that may be approaching while they are nursing their young.

Birds: Many people find young birds hopping around the yard in June and July. Most of these birds are old enough to leave the nest, but are still not efficient fliers. If you find a fully feathered, young bird with a short tail that is unable to fly, it is best to leave it where it was found.

If you find an animal that is definitely injured or orphaned, remember to:

  • Avoid direct contact;
  • Keep pets and children away;
  • Use heavy gloves to transfer the animal to a cardboard box or escape-proof container;
  • Keep the animal in a warm, quiet place;
  • Contact an authorized wildlife rehabilitator.

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